Getting Started

What is typically involved with couples counseling?

The first three sessions are considered the assessment. The couple will typically come in together for the first session, then individually for the next two sessions. The fourth session you may receive feedback from the assessment and will establish goals for treatment. Sometimes the structure will look different than that, especially if only one party is ready for treatment to begin with. It is common for individuals to come in on their own seeking counsel regarding relationship problems.

Build Rapport

We will highlight the strengths in the relationship in order to establish a positive environment. We want to use the positives of the relationship as a building ground and reference point for areas of struggle.

Define a Timeline

We will identify areas of concern and develop a timeline for the counseling sessions. Most couples will generally participate in counseling for three to six months depending on the state of the relationship.

Working Phase

In general, couples will be more hopeful and successful in the first few weeks as we focus heavily on the positives and seek to identify core issues. The few weeks after that will seem more difficult as we work to refine the couple’s styles of conflict and repair to establish rules or guidelines that work for each individual as well as the couple unit. Relapse will be natural during this stage as the couple will be establishing new habits and routines.

Management Phase

After the working phase, therapy sessions will start to seem much lighter. The appointments become more of a check-in to evaluate progress toward goals. The therapist becomes less involved, and the clients do more of the directing as they bring up victories and struggles from the past week. Sessions will start to phase out, going to bi-weekly, then once a month, then only as needed.

Cycle Completion

When this therapy cycle is complete, you will find yourself enjoying your partner more, feeling appreciated by your partner in specific ways unique to you, and feel that you have a good handle on how to manage conflict effectively as it arises.

What is typically involved with couples counseling?

Getting Started

The first three sessions are considered the assessment. The couple will typically come in together for the first session, then individually for the next two sessions. The fourth session you may receive feedback from the assessment and will establish goals for treatment. Sometimes the structure will look different than that, especially if only one party is ready for treatment to begin with. It is common for individuals to come in on their own seeking counsel regarding relationship problems.

Build Rapport

We will highlight the strengths in the relationship in order to establish a positive environment. We want to use the positives of the relationship as a building ground and reference point for areas of struggle.

Define a Timeline

We will identify areas of concern and develop a timeline for the counseling sessions. Most couples will generally participate in counseling for three to six months depending on the state of the relationship.

Working Phase

In general, couples will be more hopeful and successful in the first few weeks as we focus heavily on the positives and seek to identify core issues. The few weeks after that will seem more difficult as we work to refine the couple’s styles of conflict and repair to establish rules or guidelines that work for each individual as well as the couple unit. Relapse will be natural during this stage as the couple will be establishing new habits and routines.

Management Phase

After the working phase, therapy sessions will start to seem much lighter. The appointments become more of a check-in to evaluate progress toward goals. The therapist becomes less involved, and the clients do more of the directing as they bring up victories and struggles from the past week. Sessions will start to phase out, going to bi-weekly, then once a month, then only as needed.

Cycle Completion

When this therapy cycle is complete, you will find yourself enjoying your partner more, feeling appreciated by your partner in specific ways unique to you, and feel that you have a good handle on how to manage conflict effectively as it arises.

Find out if this is right for you

HOW CAN WE HELP

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MEET THE TEAM

Let's get a plan underway

REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT

Find out if this is right for you

HOW WE CAN HELP

Get to know our team of experts

MEET THE TEAM

Let's get a plan underway

REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT

Relationship Health

What do you look for to measure the health of the relationship?

Friendship

How knowledgeable are you about each other’s likes/dislikes? How comfortable do you feel around each other? What are your general opinions of each other? Do you have regular shared experiences (dates, dinners, projects, etc.)?

Personal Responsibility

Does each person accept responsibility for their part in creating conflict? Does the couple validate each other’s viewpoints and accept each other’s influence?

Fondness

Is there a sense of togetherness among the couple? Does the couple feel like a team? Are their inside jokes known only to the couple?

Commitment

Is there a commitment from both parties to work towards reconciliation when there is a disconnect? Does each person hold a long-term perspective in regards to the relationship? Does each person desire to work towards building and maintaining a healthy relationship?

How do you know when it’s time for a couple to be done with therapy?

  • The couple stops avoiding fights and finds ways to deal with them effectively
  • The couple has quality conversations about perpetual issues without prompting from the therapist
  • The couple begins to feel like they don’t need therapy anymore
  • There is more “we” language among the couple – more of a team atmosphere

What do you look for to measure the health of the relationship?

Friendship

How knowledgeable are you about each other’s likes/dislikes? How comfortable do you feel around each other? What are your general opinions of each other? Do you have regular shared experiences (dates, dinners, projects, etc.)?

Personal Responsibility

Does each person accept responsibility for their part in creating conflict? Does the couple validate each other’s viewpoints and accept each other’s influence?

Fondness

Is there a sense of togetherness among the couple? Does the couple feel like a team? Are their inside jokes known only to the couple?

Commitment

Is there a commitment from both parties to work towards reconciliation when there is a disconnect? Does each person hold a long-term perspective in regards to the relationship? Does each person desire to work towards building and maintaining a healthy relationship?

How do you know when it’s time for a couple to be done with therapy?

  • The couple stops avoiding fights and finds ways to deal with them effectively
  • The couple has quality conversations about perpetual issues without prompting from the therapist
  • The couple begins to feel like they don’t need therapy anymore
  • There is more “we” language among the couple – more of a team atmosphere

 

As with each patient we treat, your health and overall well-being are very important to us. If you think we can help, don’t hesitate to reach out.

As with each patient we treat, your health and overall well-being are very important to us. If you think we can help, don’t hesitate to reach out.